Call for Papers: Special issue of Journal of Quantitative Criminology on advances in place-based methods

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Papers should consider advances in place-based methods that considers new forms of data, new methods and new crime types that allow for the continued development of the crime and place literature.

 

Guest Editors: Martin A. Andresen, Simon Fraser University, Cory Haberman, University of Cincinnati, Shane D. Johnson, University College London, Wouter Steenbeek, Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement

For close to 30 years the crime and place literature has shown that the micro-place is critical to understand the spatial patterning of crime. Specifically, a small proportion of addresses or street segments account for a large proportion of crime in many cities (see Andresen et al., 2017; Braga et al., 2010; Sherman et al., 1989; Weisburd, 2015; Weisburd & Amram, 2014; Weisburd et al., 2004, 2009, 2012) and the micro-place has been shown to be critical for understanding spatial crime patterns (Haberman & Ratcliffe, 2015; Rosser et al., 2017; Steenbeek & Weisburd, 2016). The development of this sub-field within criminology has led to the advancement of place-based methods that needs to be continued if we are to move forward in the theoretical and empirical development of the crime and place literature.
One of the limitations of analyzing such small geographies is the limits to the theoretically informed variables that are available for analysis. The communities and crime literature has access to census data, but census data are too coarse for crime and place analyses: one census tract may include 10 census block groups, and each census block group may include 25 street segments and intersections. New or alternative sources of data, such as that extracted from social media and other sources, might address this limitation. In addition, the application of cutting-edge methods (for example as used in fields such as ecology or spatial epidemiology) and development of new methods (for example related to spatio-temporal point patterns, the modifiable areal unit problem, or sentiment analysis) are key ingredients to successful continuation of the crime and place tradition.
Papers in this special issue of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology are to consider advances in place-based methods that considers new forms of data, new methods and new crime types that allow for the continued development of the crime and place literature. These papers may include: cutting-edge statistical models, alternative sources of data that are available at the micro-place, and the ability of the crime and place perspective to understand newer forms of crime (Llinnares & Johnson, 2018).
All papers are subject to the normal blind review process at JQC.

Production Timeline

01 April 2019: Papers submitted to JQC. To submit the paper, go to the journal’s submission website (https://www.editorialmanager.com/joqc/) and follow the submission guidelines selecting the Special Issue option. Please also note in the submission letter that the manuscript is submitted for the planned special issue.
Summer 2019: Initial decision letters and reviews sent to authors.
Fall 2019: Final decisions made with decision letters and reviews sent to authors.
Fall 2019: Final submission.
Early 2020: Completed volume published.

 

Publicerat: Tisdag 14 Augusti